Tango ilustration
Carlos Masberger, 1930 (fragment)

The 1920s,
Tango Years

© Text by J. Alberto Mariñas

These images proceed from a great show entitled The Modern Eve, Spanish graphic illustration 1914-1935 (Mapfre Foundation, Madrid) in which it was possible to see drawings by Penagos, Bartolozzi, Climent, Loygorri, Negreiros... and many others that, in their day, were reproduced on the pages of a variety of printed media, but mainly in the weekly Blanco y Negro. They are the images of the period between wars, of a moment at which women from a certain social class began to approach concepts that up until then had been banned for those who had been considered exclusively as the grand protagonists of maternity. Sports, high speed automobiles, erotic literature, cigarettes, travel... belonged to a new way of life, which was reflected in the avant garde painting and literature, from Futurism to Ultraism, or from Constructivism to Cubism, and on the streets they were materialized by modes and fashions taken up by women.

 
Tango ilustration
 
 
Lozano Sidro
1925
 
Tango ilustration

Salvador Bartolozzi
1926

 

 

Baldrich (Roberto Martínez)
1927

Tango ilustration
     
 
Tango ilustration
 
 
Francisco Ramírez
1925
 
Tango ilustration

Rafael Penagos
1921

 

Federeico Rivas
1927

Tango ilustration
     
Dancing was part of that new life. In Spain, and throughout the world, the press had revealed tango during its beginnings but by the 20s and 30s, it had become an integral part of the gay frenzy of modern life, an era that was soon to end with the social convulsion caused by mass migration and World War II; and in the sphere of music, it ended with the arrival of swing, which began symbolically with the Normandy landing and took hold on the continent thus marking the impact of the New Deal on the reconstruction of Europe. .
     
 
Dance swing
Salvador Bartolozzi
1926